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The results are in! Field trial data shows Sorghum Partners® was the highest-performing seed brand across dryland and irrigated growing locations in 2023 at nine Kansas locations. Sorghum Partners topped out at 101.4 bu./acre. Competitors Pioneer, Dekalb, and Alta had 100.8 bu./acre, 97.8 bu./acre, and...

Check out SP2707 DT - a medium-early maturity hybrid that produces high-quality silage because of its large grain head. SP2707 DT is part of the Double Team™ Sorghum for Silage line-up and may increase bottom-line ROI, improve animal digestibility, and provide greater flexibility for your...

Congratulations to Temple Rhodes of Chestnut Manor Farms on being the Maryland first-place winner in the Dryland No-Till East division of the 2023 National Sorghum Yield Contest. Rhodes planted Sorghum Partners 58M85 DT and yielded 164.65 bushels per acre on his Queen Annes County farm. Double...

By Scott Staggenborg, Ph.D., Director of Product Marketing Each year we write a blog that looks at what should be grown in the coming year. Last year when I wrote this blog, we were facing high input costs and drought. This makes the sorghum story an...

Late July and early August bring a lot of important events like county fairs, last minute vacations before school starts, and late season insects in sorghum. Recently the two that seem to be showing up the most are sugarcane aphids and headworms. As a quick...

Drought causes feed shortages. Growers turn to sorghum. Drought has forced livestock producers in the Western United States to use up a majority of their hay. Livestock producers often count on hay being available in other parts of the country to fill in if forage supplies...

Double Team Sorghum – The perfect tool after abandoned wheat When dry weather forces you to abandon your wheat acres, being ready to plant the next crop when the drought is over is front of mind. Double Team Sorghum is an excellent tool to use in...

A Drought Fighting Tool For Farmers “It’s often too dry here for our pre-emerge herbicides to work” was what I was told by a Southwest Kansas grower many years ago when I asked him why he did not plant more grain sorghum. That comment stuck in...